To 4S or not to 4S…

I’m an Apple fanboy. I don’t know how it happened, but it did. I like iThings. But I’m a little underwhelmed about the new iPhone. Both Robyn and I are off contract, and lugging around a semi-bricked iPhone 3G, and a semi-bricked iPhone 3GS. We’ve been holding off on upgrading to the iPhone 4 believing the hype about an iPhone 5. But where is it?

So now the question – given that our phones barely receive or make calls anymore, and given that we actually do need phones (we don’t have a landline, and the phone provides internet when we’re on the road) – should we stump up the extra for a 4GS? And what provider should we use – we’ve been with Vodathree for ages, and while their customer service is adequate their network is not very good…

I’m not going to go to android – so shut your yaps you insidious open source google nerds… I like iTunes. I like my phone, iPad, and MacBook being essentially tied to the same mothership. But a flashy camera and a slightly faster processor? Seriously Apple. No wonder your share price dipped this morning… What do you reckon?

The author

Nathan runs St Eutychus. He loves Jesus. His wife. His daughter. His son. His other daughter. His dog. Coffee. And the Internet. He is the campus pastor at Creek Road South Bank, a graduate of Queensland Theological College (M. Div) and the Queensland University of Technology (B. Journ). He spent a significant portion of his pre-ministry-as-a-full-time-job life working in Public Relations, and now loves promoting Jesus in Brisbane and online. He can't believe how great it is that people pay him to talk and think about Jesus.

3 thoughts on “To 4S or not to 4S…”

    1. Didn’t appear to work… I’ll check to see if there was a missing tag or something – but I assume it’s the one man spoken word tour about conditions in factories in China? That would seem to rule out buying any mobile phone… the guy didn’t single Apple out because they were the only company using Chinese factory labour, he singled them out because they’re an industry leader and I think he said they were most likely to lead the changes…

      I guess my approach to consumer ethics, based on having thought about it in the sphere of coffee, is not to stop buying the product, but to start activism to improve conditions. I’m not sure that product boycotts serve any purpose, and factory closures would seem to add insult to injury when it comes to the workers – and the SMH story I read about the guy who did the investigating suggested that Apple took his experiences pretty seriously…

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