Archives For Curiosities

Man jumps off incredibly super high building. Lands in pool. Survives. There’s a parachute which makes this survival slightly more probable (well. Significantly. But still).

A bit of a language warning.

Bird. Meet camera.

I like where the ubiquity of cameras is taking us.

We recently added a puppy to our family menagerie. Taking our pet tally up to 1 turtle, 4 chickens, and said puppy. It turns out puppies chew up lots of stuff they’re not meant to. They’re expensive. So too, are children. They break stuff.

calvin

There are all sorts of studies out there about how much it costs to raise a child – few, if any, consider the damages bill. So this study, which uses Calvin, from Calvin and Hobbes, as a test case, is ground breaking research.

 

“According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, raising a child from start to age 17 costs, for those in the middle-income groups, anywhere from $226,800 to $264,600 total[1]. These costs include housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, education, and other miscellaneous items (such as entertainment, personal care, and reading materials[2].) Missing from this estimate is an explicit approximation of the amount of damage that children can cause (here, damage refers to that of the break-a-window physical kind, not that of the mommy-and-daddy-need-a-therapist emotional kind). Such an estimate would increase the accuracy of the USDA’s estimate and the budgets of new parents, depending on how destructive they project their child to be. “…

To estimate the cost from damaged goods, I searched amazon.com for comparable items, with some exceptions (e.g., Calvin’s Mom seems somewhat fashionable, so when Calvin placed an incontinent toad on her sweater, I looked for a replacement on jcrew.com). To estimate cost for property damage, I used homewyse.com and fixr.com (using the zip code for Chagrin Falls, OH). In the few instances in which a monetary value was given in the comic, I used that value.

Results and Discussion

In total, Calvin caused an estimated $15,955.50 worth of damage over the duration of the comic strip (Figure 1). Damage ranged from a broken glass jar[6] ($2 from amazon.com) to a flooded house[7] ($4,798.83 from homewyse.com). Taking into account Watterson’s sabbaticals (see Figure 1) and the November start to the comics, Calvin caused $1,850.55 of damage per year. For context, the USDA estimates that middle-income families spend an estimated $1,750 per year on child care and education for 6 year-olds. In fact, the amount of damage caused by Calvin would rank 4th out of the USDA’s categories in annual expenditures, behind Housing, Food, and Transportation, and ahead of Education, Miscellaneous, Health Care, and Clothing.

Let there be (neon) light

This is fascinating. I’ve always kind of wondered how neon lights were made, but never really investigated.

 

Why the Internet exists

Pretty sure we can shut up shop now.

The Pixar Theory as a video

Previously. Now…

 

I think people who choose careers that aren’t glamorous, but are chances to serve people, are to be admired. I think when these people turn mundane jobs into performance art, they are to be celebrated. So here are three.

 

It’s weird. I’ve seen all three doing the rounds this week. Have you seen any more?

 

Ron Burgundy would be proud.

All the fights from the first three Michael Bay Transformers movies supercut together. No plot. All is as it should be.

If the mainstream media isn’t dead by the time I retire, then I would love to follow Greg Packer’s example. From the NY Times.

With no special skill or expertise, Greg Packer has been quoted by media outlets nearly a thousand times. Since his name first appeared on newsprint, in 1995, he’s spoken to reporters on subjects ranging from the war in Iraq to the release of the first iPhone. Greg’s campaign to be the most quoted man in news has been so successful that the Associated Press sent its staff a memo that essentially banned interviews with him. “

 

Via 22 Words.

This is more entertaining than I thought it would be. It makes those movie scenes where a few well trained heroes take down a mob of henchmen slightly more plausible.

Classics re-emojined

I’m not a huge fan of the use of emoticons. But I have found myself using the little emoji thumbs up thing in a few text messages lately. Please help me.

I do like these reworks of old school art by Nastya Nudnik. Part 1 is just emoji representations of classic paintings, Part 3 is classic paintings made into posters for modern movies, it’s Part 2, characters from classic paintings doing social media stuff, and part 4, a slightly (a)religiously themed set of paintings with error messages, that I’m a little fond of. Part 5 offers the google treatment to a few paintings.

K-Strass the Yo-yo guy is my favourite non celebrity of all time. In the spirit of K-Strass comes this TV chef – Chef Keith – who isn’t – and yet scores a series of appearances on daytime TV.

It seems the two characters are linked to the same comedy crew.

This is great trainwreck style television. A zookeeper is trying to explain the circle of life to an increasingly indignant interviewer.

“But one does not tend to be dismembered after a vaccination.”

I missed the Flappy Bird juggernaut. In fact. Completely. The developer is killing it tonight because it is stressing him out.

Poor guy. The internet doesn’t like that idea very much.

But if you’re addicted – you’ve got to know when to hold them, know when to fold them… There’s a language warning here…

Know when to walk away. And know when to hit your stupid phone with a hammer.