Backward Masking Unmasked – Part Two – How to spot rebellion (and not be rebellious)

Of all the bands Aranza doesn’t like – the Eagles are on top of the pile. They get a whole chapter. Here’s why you should be worried (if you’re an Eagles fan).

Hotel California

The only line in parenthesis is “(such a lovely face)” – on the inside cover of the album there’s a photo with a face in the window. If you squint he looks like the black pope (the Satanic pope) Anton Zandor LeVay. “Is this an accident? Hardly”… the lyrics also say “we haven’t had that spirit since 1969” – the year the Satanic Bible was published… and the spirit in the song was wine, which is of course the “Holy Spirit”… convinced? No. Well, if you play the song backwards you apparently hear “yes, Satan organised his own religion” – if you squint with your ears…

The Seven signs of Rebellion

  1. Rebels never do all of what they’re told to do.
  2. They’re never completely honest with themselves or others.
  3. They are blameshifters, always placing the blame on others and not themselves.
  4. They will give up wrongs but not their rights. As with Saul they will giev up the bad and keep what they feel is good.
  5. They are always questioning the authority of others, “who are you to tell me what is right or wrong?” As with Saul who denied Samuel’s accusation.
  6. They are very prideful, thinking highly about themselves, Saul was like that.
  7. They are very stubborn with the “I’m right and you’re wrong” attitude, instead of being hmble and examining the facts to see if they be true.

The Six Steps of Rebellion

Jacob Aranza isn’t a man who offers problems without solutions. When he spoke in Texas, on what was to be a one week engagement, he ended up staying for three weeks and holding record burnings. He wants you not to be a rebellious youth. Here are the six steps of rebellion. If you find yourself identifying with the list above already, or spotting any of this list in your life – you need help.

  1. Disobedience
  2. Self-Deceit (not honest with yourself)
  3. Stubbornness
  4. Looking for idols
  5. Witchcraft and the occult
  6. Death

“If you see any of these steps in your life, or in the lives of those around you it’s not too late to stop the pattern. You don’t have to live the life of a rock and roll rebel.”

Here’s how to assess your favourite (secular) rock group.

1. Do they glorify God?
2. Are they building God’s Kingdom, or destroying it?
3. Can you see Jesus is Lord in their lives?
4. Are they serving themselves or the living God?

He says “unfortunately Christian artists are suffering financially because Christians are supporting non-Christian artists… There are no good reasons why Christian young people can not hear good quality music about the Rock that never rolls… Jesus.”

And now, some stuff about your bands…

Black Sabbath

With a name like Black Sabbath you could only expect them to be what they are. They were introduced to the British press by a party featuring the mock sword sacrifice of a semi-nude girl. They were known to hold masses before some of their concerts. Their first album, Black Sabbath pictured a witch on the front.

A few days ago I was watching Black Sabbath in concert on television. In the middle of the concert the lead singer of the band began to make a satanic salute. It is made by extending the little finger and index finger. He yelled to the crowd and in response they also made the sign. Then he looked at the sign he was making with his hand and said “some people think they know what this means, but we know what this really means. It means long live rock and roll.”


Judas Priest

This English group’s promotional material says that their new album Sin After Sin is selling sin, or has sin for sale.

“Judas Priest, a new group from the industrial heartland of England is selling sin on their new album. Their new album is called Sin After Sin, but don’t worry you will still be saved,” the promotional piece says.

Of course the message of the album is that a person can live the way he wants and still get by with it, still be saved.

John Denver

The album Rocky Mountain High talks of a born-again experience by a man born in his 27th year. In a Newsweek interview, Denver said, “As a self-appointed Messiah, I view music as far more than just entertainment.”
He sees it as a tool to promote the gospel of a new secular religion. The leaders of this religion claim to control the universe and “claim to be gods” (Newsweek, December 20, 1976).
In another song he says, “Apollo is the major deity of the sun, light, music and art” (Symbols, Signs and Their meanings, A. Whittich, 1960, p. 190).
People magazine interviewd Denver and revealed that he has tried Rofling, Aikido, EST, Pyramid Power and other mystical religions, yet still feels fragmented (People, December 8, 1980, p/ 65).

6 thoughts on “Backward Masking Unmasked – Part Two – How to spot rebellion (and not be rebellious)”

  1. That phrase – The Rock that never rolls – makes me giggle every time I hear it.

  2. Ben McLaughlin

    Wow, what a genius. This guy totally rocks. He has succeeded in making me like those bands even more.

    However, he’s not totally bad. The Eagles DO suck, evil or not.

    Top post, bro.

  3. Aarggh, just started replying to this, hit the wrong key and wiped it all.

    Anyway, this will force me to be brief. I was just going to say that Aranza’s book fits into a canon of anti-rock literature that’s still quite strong in Independent Baptist circles. It’s based on a basic assumption that if something seems remotely sinful, Christians should avoid all forms of it.

    But it also raises a problem with mainstream evangelical Christianity. For a long while, we haven’t passed any real judgement on music at all. I can’t think of too many times I’ve heard a well-thought-out theology of music.

    So it’s led to a situation where on the one hand we’ve got a group of Christians saying, “Don’t listen to anything by non-Christians (and also avoid anything by Christians with a syncopated beat and drums)” – but on the other hand, there are Christians who think music is neutral and will listen to anything and everything. (And then take anything and everything and try to fit some Christian lyrics over the top of it.)

    As someone who works in the music industry (albeit the classical music industry, so I can fake my way in Baptist circles, because Beethoven only *occasionally* uses drums and backbeats…), I think there’s a great need for us to develop a better theology of music – one that recognises that Christians don’t have the monopoly on musical talent – but also one that recognises that music is not completely neutral.

    Great blog, by the way!

    1. Nathan Campbell

      Hey Matthew,

      Thanks. Appreciate your thoughts as one in the industry.

      I think the other point with the assumption of neutrality is the assumption that somehow if we consume culture in order to “contextualise” the gospel message we’re unaffected by it.

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