guerilla marketing

Trojan T-Shirts: Marketing by subterfuge

What do you get the German skinhead who has everything? Especially if you want them to reform form their Skinhead ways? You get them a nice skull and cross bone t-shirt. And you give it to them. For free. But you make it so that after one wash the shirt changes completely.

Brilliant.

“With a skull-and-crossbones logo and the message “Hardcore Rebels – National and Free,” some 250 black T-shirts given away at a recent right-wing extremist rock festival were quickly snapped up. But there was more to the tough-looking image than met the eye.

Once the rightist rockers washed their new shirts, they were dismayed to find an entirely different message: “If your T-shirt can do it, so can you. We’ll help to free you from right-wing extremism.” The offer, complete with contact information, came from a group called Exit Deutschland, which helps people get out of the neo-Nazi scene.”

More here.

Sticky marketing

Human Rights activists spend far too much time sitting in cages in public spaces and doing things that are too easy to ignore. Largely because they’re so obnoxiously offensive that we immediately shield ourselves from the horrors they describe. Their campaigns aren’t generally “sticky” for this reason.

Stickiness is an important part of any marketing campaign – finding a message that is memorable is vital if your product isn’t something that involves an immediate and spontaneous purchasing decision (like a bottle of Coke). 

Stickiness was particularly important to this UNICEF anti-landmine campaign, in a more literal sense.

Adhesive stickers with bottom side simulating a detonator for explosive were placed on the pavements in Zurich. When the passers by checked their shoes, they saw the message from UnicefIn many other countries you would now be mutilated! Help the victims of landmines!

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