walldrop

walldrop number 4

Thank you for your message.  People often write to us about words they have devised, and I am afraid our response is very dull.  Before we can even think about drafting a dicttionary entry for a new word, we need a large body of published evidence showing that it has been in widespread and sustained use over a period of at least five years.  We are slow to add words to the full Oxford English Dictionary Online, because once added they are never deleted.

You can read more about what is involved at http://www.askoxford.com/asktheexperts/faq (see ‘Will you put in my new word?’ in the Dictionaries section).  I shall certainly record your contribution in our files, but cannot promise that it will result in an entry.

Margot Charlton

Oxford English Dictionary

Walldrop number 2

I am so taken with my new word that I’ve submitted it to the Oxford English Dictionary… my chances of success are less than good.

Here is the email I sent:

Dear Oxford English Dictionary Editor (or whomever reads this correspondence),

I wish to submit a new word for your consideration.

The rise of Facebook and other social networking hubs has, I believe, created a new sphere of voyeurism whereby readers are able to secretly observe the conversations of their friends via the Facebook element known as “the wall”. As “eavesdropping” was so named for listening to the conversations of others through the “eaves”, I submit the following word and definition:

Walldrop:
intr.v., -dropped, -drop·ping, -drops.

To read the conversations of others on Facebook

Etymology – derived from eavesdrop

Best regards,

Nathan Campbell
Corporate Communications Executive

I included my title because it makes me sound impressively wordy.

Just to ensure some modicum of success I also submitted my word to urbandictionary.com which goes as close to guaranteeing inclusion as possible. I’ll let you know how the campaign goes.

Walldropping

Walldrop:
intr.v., -dropped, -drop·ping, -drops.

1. To read the conversations of others on Facebook

2. To fall off a wall eg – Humpty Dumpty

I don’t know about you – but Facebook awakens my inner voyeur – I think walldropping is a good new word to describe using the “wall to wall” link to peer into other people’s conversations.

You heard it here first people. Remember that. I don’t think you get royalties for coining new words. Coining is therefore an inappropriate word to describe the creation of new words.

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