Classics re-emojined

I’m not a huge fan of the use of emoticons. But I have found myself using the little emoji thumbs up thing in a few text messages lately. Please help me.

I do like these reworks of old school art by Nastya Nudnik. Part 1 is just emoji representations of classic paintings, Part 3 is classic paintings made into posters for modern movies, it’s Part 2, characters from classic paintings doing social media stuff, and part 4, a slightly (a)religiously themed set of paintings with error messages, that I’m a little fond of. Part 5 offers the google treatment to a few paintings.

The author

Nathan runs St Eutychus. He loves Jesus. His wife. His daughter. His son. His other daughter. His dog. Coffee. And the Internet. He is the campus pastor at Creek Road South Bank, a graduate of Queensland Theological College (M. Div) and the Queensland University of Technology (B. Journ). He spent a significant portion of his pre-ministry-as-a-full-time-job life working in Public Relations, and now loves promoting Jesus in Brisbane and online. He can't believe how great it is that people pay him to talk and think about Jesus.

One thought on “Classics re-emojined”

  1. Emoticons are a necessary evil. I suppose one could argue that good writing would lead to be able to spot things like sarcasm and playfulness, but most of the writing we do on the internet is not literature, but rather quickly typed out reactions, and it’s notoriously easy to misread emotions. When we take the the physical clues out of socialising, how do we easily indicate and recognise when things are not the cold, literal meaning we might be reading? I suppose one might also argue that we should never be facetious unless we know the reader knows us well enough off-line to recognise it.

    These works remind me of a project we had to do in grade 10 art.

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