Tag Archives: Google Reader

My post-Google Reader future

I’ve been playing around with new feed readers – with the impending demise of Google Reader. Here is my dilemma, and my solution.

feedly
Image Credit: Feedly newsletter.

I love Reeder. It’s a great app. I have it on phone, iPad, and Mac – and it plays nicely across all my iThings. So I was putting most of my eggs in whatever basket Reeder managed to bring to the table after the developer promised life would continue beyond the death of Google Reader.

Reeder is working with Feedlyonly in the IOS app format for now – so my desktop app is going to have to wait for an update. Feedly has its own apps too.

Digg’s new reader looks nice. And I liked the feature on the process of pulling it together that I read on it on Wired.

I’ve transferred my Reader subscriptions to both Digg and Feedly. Feedly looks the nicest. Digg is the most stripped back.

What are you doing in the post Google world?

Google Reader tips #1

I love Google Reader. You should too. Ali recently mentioned that returning to Google Reader after a holiday can be a bit overwhelming. Especially if you sign up for hundreds of feeds.

Here’s my hot tip. Which might be obvious to many of you. If you are drowning in an unread sea switch to “list view” using the link on the top right of your screen. Scroll through the headings, click the interesting ones, star the ones you want to save and then click “Mark all as read”…

You’ll save much time and energy.

I only started doing this this week. It has saved me a lot of wasted time already. I commend it to you.

That is all.

How I find this rubbish (and the time to post it)

A lot of readers – both casual readers who I know in real life, and fellow bloggers, have made comments on my seemingly inhuman ability to track down the stupid stuff I post here. And almost as many wonder how I find the time.

I have been umming and ahhing about sharing my “secret” with the world. But today, Jeff, speculated that I have invented some sort of time travelling device just so that I can surf the Internet.

It’s time to come clean. Here’s the method to my madness.

  1. I try to write one or two substantive posts a day in my main page part – and I try to cover off each category in a week (including a little bit of whatever is going on around me in day to day life. These bits are easy. I don’t have to go looking.
  2. I subscribe to a bunch of blogs in each category I write about (I have 349 subscriptions in Google Reader).
  3. Each morning I skim through them as quickly as I can – there are usually about 600 posts when I log in before heading off to work. I read all the posts by people in full, skim the gadgets, bookmarking aggregators and the “how to” blogs I subscribe to looking for eligible blog fodder.
  4. When I see a post I like, that I don’t want to rewrite substantively, I share it.
  5. When I see something I want to post I “star” it.
  6. When I have a spare moment I go through my starred pile and post them. Posts in the curiosities column take me about five minutes. I have 207 posts in the queue. You can see what’s “coming up” on my Starred Items page.
  7. I visit the blogs of people who comment regularly, or who I know, and keep up with discussions because you never know when someone’s going to say something blogworthy.

During work hours I’ll keep my Google Reader open for down time, I have my gmail open all day (and get emails when people comment), and I keep Windows Live Writer open to work on the longer posts when I’m on the phone or waiting for a meeting.

Links from August 10, 2009

Links from August 9, 2009

Links from August 6, 2009

Links from August 5, 2009

A bunch of links – August 3, 2009

  • #593. Being a Christian Culture Snob

  • Literals

  • Use Wolfram Alpha as a Writing Tool [Writing]
    “If you’ve ever been stuck trying to fill out a trio of words ending in “ation,” looking for the transliteration of a foreign script, finding proper pronunciation or hyphenation, or other nerdy word tasks, Wolfram Alpha can often pull off the job with a few key words. Enter word before your term to get an overview of what Wolfram knows about a phrase, or words starting with or words ending with to fit a certain phrase into your text.”

  • 50 Fresh Portfolio Websites for Your Inspiration

  • A coin flip isn#39;t random
    Yet recent research into coin flips has discovered that the laws of mechanics determine the outcome of coin tosses: The startling finding is that they aren’t random. Instead, for natural flips, the chance of a coin landing in the same position as it started is about 51 percent. Heads facing up predicts heads; tails predicts tails.

  • From the interwebs part 2

A bunch of links – August 2, 2009

A bunch of links – July 30, 2009